'Collaborators' are undermining Britain's Brexit bet, PM says

'Collaborators' are undermining Britain's Brexit bet, PM says

Reuters  | Aug 14, 2019 15:45

'Collaborators' are undermining Britain's Brexit bet, PM says

By William James and Guy Faulconbridge

LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday some British lawmakers hoping to block Brexit were engaged in "terrible" collaboration with the European Union by undermining London's negotiating hand and so making no deal more likely.

Hours after senior lawmakers said they would seek to prevent any attempt to ignore parliament over Brexit, Johnson used a question-and-answer session on Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) to attack them.

"There is a terrible kind of collaboration as it were going on between those who think they can block Brexit in parliament and our European friends," Johnson, who has been hailed by the U.S. president as "Britain's Trump", said on Facebook.

"We need our European friends to compromise and the more they think that there's a chance that Brexit can be blocked in parliament, the more adamant they are in sticking to their position," Johnson said.

Johnson's use of the word "collaborator" has historical echoes for Britons given the use of that epithet for people who cooperated with Nazi Germany during World War Two.

"Shameful language of fascism and authoritarianism from liar Johnson + unelected advisors - plain and simple. European neighbours are our friends not 'enemy' to 'collaborate' with," Labour lawmaker Stephen Doughty said on Twitter.

Johnson's comments followed remarks by former finance minister Philip Hammond that parliament will block a no-deal Brexit if unelected people behind Johnson try to wrench Britain out on Oct. 31 without agreement.

The United Kingdom is heading towards a constitutional crisis at home and a showdown with the EU as Johnson has vowed to leave the bloc in 78 days time without a deal unless it agrees to renegotiate a Brexit divorce.

After more than three years of Brexit dominating EU affairs, the bloc has repeatedly refused to reopen the Withdrawal Agreement which includes an Irish border insurance policy that Johnson's predecessor, Theresa May, agreed in November.

Hammond, who served as May's finance minister for three years, said unelected people in Johnson's Downing Street office were setting London on an "inevitable" course towards a no-deal Brexit by demanding the Irish backstop be dropped.

"The people behind this know that that means that there will be no deal," Hammond told the BBC. "Parliament is clearly opposed to a no-deal exit, and the prime minister must respect that."

LAWMAKERS' RESOLVE

The former minister's first public intervention since resigning indicates the determination of a group of influential lawmakers to thwart Johnson if he goes for a no-deal Brexit.

Hammond said he was confident parliament, where a majority oppose a no-deal Brexit, would find a way to block that outcome.

It is, however, unclear if lawmakers have the unity or power to use the 800-year-old heart of British democracy to prevent a no-deal Brexit on Oct. 31 - likely to be the United Kingdom's most consequential move since World War Two.

Opponents of no deal say it would be a disaster for what was once one of the West's most stable democracies. A disorderly divorce, they say, would hurt global growth, send shockwaves through financial markets and weaken London’s claim to be the world’s preeminent financial centre.

Brexit supporters say there may be short-term disruption from a no-deal exit but that the economy will thrive if cut free from what they cast as a doomed experiment in integration that has led to Europe falling behind China and the United States.

Heading towards one of the biggest constitutional crises in at least a century, Britain's elite are quarrelling over how, when and even if the result of the shock 2016 referendum will be implemented.

Part of the problem is that Britain's constitution, once touted as a global model, is uncodified and vague. It relies on precedent, but there is little for Brexit.

The House of Commons speaker John Bercow told an audience in Scotland that lawmakers could prevent a no-deal Brexit and that he would fight any attempt to prorogue, or suspend, parliament “with every bone in my body”.

Johnson, who replaced May after she failed three times to get her Brexit deal through parliament, has refused to rule out proroguing the House of Commons and Brexit supporters have vociferously encouraged him to do so if necessary.

Johnson's top advisor, Dominic Cummings, has reportedly said he could delay calling a general election until after Oct. 31, even if he lost a no confidence motion, allowing for a no-deal Brexit while parliament is dissolved.

© Reuters. Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson attends a roundtable on the criminal justice system at 10 Downing Street

Clearly with him in mind, Hammond said there were people "who are pulling the strings in Downing Street, those who are setting the strategy." Cummings declined to comment to Reuters.

Related News

Latest comments

Add a Comment
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Andy Bolstridge
Andy Bolstridge

we are a democratic society, says Bercow, but we can't have those pesky people getting what they voted for.....   ... (Read More)

Aug 14, 2019 09:13 GMT· Reply
Franky_Remo
Franky_Remo

Brexit voters - ' The EU stops us having sovereignty, lets close parliament and block our own sovereignty'  ... (Read More)

Aug 13, 2019 21:23 GMT· Reply
Discussion
Write a reply...
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.

Trading in financial instruments and/or cryptocurrencies involves high risks including the risk of losing some, or all, of your investment amount, and may not be suitable for all investors. Prices of cryptocurrencies are extremely volatile and may be affected by external factors such as financial, regulatory or political events. Trading on margin increases the financial risks.
Before deciding to trade in financial instrument or cryptocurrencies you should be fully informed of the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite, and seek professional advice where needed.
Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. The data and prices on the website are not necessarily provided by any market or exchange, but may be provided by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual price at any given market, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Fusion Media and any provider of the data contained in this website will not accept liability for any loss or damage as a result of your trading, or your reliance on the information contained within this website.
It is prohibited to use, store, reproduce, display, modify, transmit or distribute the data contained in this website without the explicit prior written permission of Fusion Media and/or the data provider. All intellectual property rights are reserved by the providers and/or the exchange providing the data contained in this website.
Fusion Media may be compensated by the advertisers that appear on the website, based on your interaction with the advertisements or advertisers.

English (USA) English (India) English (Canada) English (Australia) English (South Africa) English (Philippines) English (Nigeria) Deutsch Español (España) Español (México) Français Italiano Nederlands Português (Portugal) Polski Português (Brasil) Русский Türkçe ‏العربية‏ Ελληνικά Svenska Suomi עברית 日本語 한국어 中文 香港 Bahasa Indonesia Bahasa Melayu ไทย Tiếng Việt हिंदी
Sign out
Are you sure you want to sign out?
NoYes
CancelYes
Saving Changes

+